Author Summary and Video Summary guidelines

What is the Author Summary?

The Author Summary is 200-250 word non-technical summary of the research, for non-expert readers.

What are the aims of the Author Summary?

The Author Summary is aimed to make the findings more accessible and available to a wide audience, but also to increase the readership of an article. Therefore, we require that authors of accepted articles write a short non-technical summary of their research for non-expert readers. We also ask the authors to provide their photo, or a photo of their research group, or a photo of their institution. If the authors do not want their photo to be published, the figure from their article may be used, or the appropriate illustration chosen by the Blog Editor.

Where will the Author Summary be published?

The Author Summary will be published at the Journal’s BLOG (blog.bjbms.org), our social media, and sent to web-based medical news services (e.g. medicalxpress.com, phys.org). This will significantly improve the visibility of the article and the authors.

The BJBMS Author Summary Guidelines

The authors should highlight a broader context of the study and present the significance or possible implications of the study simply and objectively. Authors should avoid the use of acronyms and complex terminology wherever possible. The text is subject to editorial change and should not simply repeat text from the abstract or manuscript.

The authors should provide short paragraphs for the following questions. Paragraphs should avoid technical language.

Paragraph 1

What is the current knowledge on this topic/problem? Why was this study done? What question did this study address?

Authors should reflect on what was known about the topic before the research was published and why the research was needed.
e.g. Previous studies have shown that… Therefore, we tried to assess/find…
In this study, we sought to explore... because the study on the influence of…was lacking.
It has been known that... However, in this study, we aimed to demonstrate/argue against…

Paragraph 2

What did the researchers do and find?

Authors should briefly describe the study design that was used and the study’s major findings. Do include the headline numbers from the study, such as the sample size and key findings.
e.g. The study was performed on 500 patients with... divided into two groups…
In this study, we found the connection between…
We studied the incidence of…among the patients with…and concluded…

Paragraph 3

What do these findings mean? What is the contribution of this study to our knowledge?

Authors should reflect on the new knowledge generated by the research and the implications for practice, research, policy, or public health. Authors should also consider how the interpretation of the study’s findings may be affected by the study limitations.
e.g. Results from our study indicate... However, further research is needed, because…
The results of our research proved that such treatment regimen had better outcomes…
Based on these results, we can conclude…

Paragraph 4
How this might influence/change clinical practice? What could be further directions for research?
Authors should suggest how the research results might be used in clinical practice, or what are the further questions that need to be addressed in future studies.

e.g. Based on our data, we believe that the first-choice treatment should be…
Our results suggest…can be considered a safe procedure…
The safety of this drug should be further studied in patients with…

Video Summary

Instead of the usual text-only Author Summary, we decided to introduce a new way to present the research findings to our readers and followers - using a Video Summary.

Basically, the same principles and guidelines apply as for the Author Summary. The only difference is that the summary is presented in a video form.

We suggest our authors record a video using their smartphone, or a laptop camera, either in their office, or laboratory, hospital, library, etc.

Authors are asked to first introduce themselves, and then present (either tell or read) their story about the study within 2-3 minutes, by addressing all the above-mentioned questions, i.e.:

1) What is the current knowledge on this topic/problem? Why was this study done? What question did this study address?
2) What did the researchers do and find?
3) What do these findings mean? What is the contribution of this study to our knowledge?
4) How this might influence/change clinical practice? What could be further directions for research?

The authors can present alone, or together with their colleagues. More than one speaker is also allowed.

We strongly encourage our authors to present their research summary using video technology, as it is an easy way to convey and share information. We are striving to keep up with the trends and make the published articles more accessible to our readers, followers, and to both scientific and non-scientific audiences.

Our Editorial office will assist you in preparing the video summary, and will edit your recorded video before the publication.

An example of the Video summary can be found here:
https://blog.bjbms.org/the-natural-adaptive-evolution-of-cancer/