Metabolic aspects of surgical subcutaneous fat removal: An umbrella review and implications for future research

Authors

  • Saif Badran Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Department of Population Medicine, College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5955-1734
  • Suhail A. Doi Department of Population Medicine, College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2630-2125
  • Moustapha Hamdi Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Brussels University Hospital, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels, Belgium
  • Atalla Hammouda Department of Plastic Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
  • Sara Alharami Department of Plastic Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
  • Justin Clark Institute for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Queensland, Australia https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0133-1613
  • Omran A. H. Musa Department of Population Medicine, College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6878-4364
  • Abdul-Badi Abou-Samra Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Qatar Foundation, Doha, Qatar; Qatar Metabolic Institute, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  • Abdella M. Habib College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7453-3932

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17305/bjbms.2022.8175

Keywords:

Surgical subcutaneous fat removal, body contouring surgery, metabolism, insulin resistance, inflammation, adipokines

Abstract

Although obesity is a preventable disease, maintaining a normal body weight can be very challenging and difficult, which has led to a significant increase in the demand for surgical subcutaneous fat removal (SSFR) to improve physical appearance. The need for SSFR is further exacerbated because of the global rise in the number of bariatric surgeries, which is currently the single most durable intervention for mitigating obesity. Fat tissue is now recognized as a vital endocrine organ that produces several bioactive proteins. Thus, SSFR-mediated weight (fat) loss can potentially have significant metabolic effects; however, currently, there is no consensus on this issue. This review focuses on the metabolic sequelae after SSFR interventions for dealing with cosmetic body appearance. Data was extracted from existing systematic reviews and the diversity of possible metabolic changes after SSFR are reported along with gaps in the knowledge and future directions for research and practice. We conclude that there is a potential for metabolic sequelae after SSFR interventions and their clinical implications for the safety of the procedures as well as for our understanding of subcutaneous adipose tissue biology and insulin resistance are discussed.

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Metabolic aspects of surgical subcutaneous fat removal: an umbrella review and implications for future research

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Published

16-03-2023

How to Cite

1.
Metabolic aspects of surgical subcutaneous fat removal: An umbrella review and implications for future research. Biomol Biomed [Internet]. 2023 Mar. 16 [cited 2024 May 20];23(2):235–247. Available from: https://www.bjbms.org/ojs/index.php/bjbms/article/view/8175