The impact of prior obesity surgery on glucose metabolism after body contouring surgery: A pilot study

Authors

  • Saif Badran Department of Population Medicine, College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5955-1734
  • Suhail A. Doi Department of Population Medicine, College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar
  • Atalla Hammouda Department of Population Medicine, College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar
  • Hoda Khoogaly Qatar Metabolic Institute, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  • Mohammad Muneer Department of Population Medicine, College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar
  • Meis J. Alkasem Qatar Metabolic Institute, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  • Abdul-Badi Abou-Samra Qatar Metabolic Institute, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Qatar Foundation, Doha, Qatar
  • Abdella M. Habib College of Medicine, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17305/bb.2023.8827

Keywords:

Obesity, Obesity surgery, Bariatric Surgery, Body Contouring Surgery, Surgical fat removal, Insulin Resistance, Glucose Homeostasis, Metabolism

Abstract

Body contouring surgery enhances physical appearance by means of surgical subcutaneous fat removal (SSFR). However, it remains unclear how SSFR may affect glucose metabolism and its broader effects on the endocrine system, especially in individuals who have undergone obesity (bariatric) surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of SSFR on glucose excursion and insulin resistance in such patients, by examining them over three visits (within 1 week before surgery, 1 week after surgery, and 6 weeks after surgery). The independent impact of SSFR and history of obesity surgery on glucose homeostasis was evaluated in 29 participants, of whom ten patients (34%) had a history of obesity surgery. Indices of glucose metabolism were evaluated using cluster robust-error logistic regression. Results indicated that SSFR led to a gross improvement in insulin resistance at 6 weeks after the surgery in all patient’s irrespective of BMI, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) status, or history of obesity surgery (OR 0.22; p = 0.042). However, no effect was observed on glucose excursion except for a transient increase at visit 2 (1 week after surgery) in those without prior obesity surgery. Interestingly, participants with a history of obesity surgery had approximately half the odds being in the upper tertile for HOMA-IR (OR 0.44; p = 0.142) and ten-folds lower odds of having severely abnormal glucose excursion (OR 0.09; p = 0.031), irrespective of their BMI, T2D status, or time post SSFR. In conclusion, this study showed that body contouring surgery through SSFR resulted in (at least) short-term improvement in insulin resistance (independent of the participant’s BMI, T2D status, or history of obesity surgery) without affecting glucose excursion under the GTT. On the contrary, obesity surgery may have a long-term effect on glucose excursion, possibly due to sustained improvement of pancreatic ß-cell function.

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The impact of prior obesity surgery on glucose metabolism after body contouring surgery:  A pilot study

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Published

04-09-2023

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Section

Translational and Clinical Research

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How to Cite

1.
The impact of prior obesity surgery on glucose metabolism after body contouring surgery: A pilot study. Biomol Biomed [Internet]. 2023 Sep. 4 [cited 2024 Apr. 21];23(5):873–882. Available from: https://www.bjbms.org/ojs/index.php/bjbms/article/view/8827